Here at Food Matters, we love everything to do with juicing. Juicing helps to detoxify the body, is an instant nutrition hit, and the health benefits of juicing are endless.

When we say “juicing” we don’t mean a store-bought bottled juice made from concentrate. We’re talking about fresh, nourishing juices made by you in your own kitchen, or the cold pressed organic varieties you can find in some juice bars or organic health stores.

If you’re new to juicing, you may be wondering where to start when it comes to buying a juicer. It's actually one of the topics we get asked about the most, so we created a Juicer Buying Guide to help you out!

As always, we stay true to the fact that the best juicer you can use is the one that’s sitting in your cupboard. Tweet - The best juicer you can use is the one that's sitting in your cupboard.

There are so many different varieties of juicers on the market, which all come with a list of pros and cons. If you’re looking to purchase your first juicer, or you’re due for an update, keep reading as we chat about what you can get with your money when it comes to buying your new kitchen bestie - a juicer!

In our Juicer Buying Guide we talk even more about the benefits of juicing and explain the difference between a centrifugal juicer and a cold press juicer. So be sure to check it out! 

For now, we’ve decided to take a look at some of the most popular juicers on the market and their price range, so you can determine which one suits your needs and budget at this point in time. 

Centrifugal Juicers (eg. Jack LaLanne, Breville Juice Fountain)

Average Price: $85-$299 USD

The Jack LaLanne juicer and the Breville Juice Fountain are two of the most popular choices on the market. They are also some of the most affordable brands. Both are centrifugal juicers, which means food is typically fed through a vertical chute and then pushed into a rapidly spinning mesh chamber with sharp teeth on its base.

Centrifugal juicers work best with soft and hard fruits and vegetables, but not quite as well with leafy greens like kale or spinach, or with wheatgrass. This style of juicer uses blades to break apart the food. However, this can create heat, and leads to a loss of nutrients.

Typically, a juicer of this nature produces more pulp waste than a cold press juicer. If you’re mainly interested in juicing fruit and non-leafy vegetables every now and then, a centrifugal juicer may be all you need to serve up your next healthy juice.

A Centrifugal Juicer Is Perfect If:

  • You use juice in cooking, baking or where heat is applied,
  • You only juice every now and again,
  • Your goals are to simply get more fruits and vegetables into your diet,
  • You’re not ready to invest in a cold pressed juicer just yet.

Cold Press Juicers (eg. Hurom, Omega, Tribest)

Average Price: $300+ USD

A slow or cold press juicer uses a rotating instrument similar to a corkscrew to squeeze the juice out of the fruit or vegetable. Juicers with fast spinning blades have the potential to create friction and heat which can reduce the nutrient quality of your juice. When you use a cold press juicer, this high-speed process is eliminated, as the motor in a cold press juicer is extremely powerful, yet operates at a very low speed. Keeping as much of the nutrition intact as possible!

A Cold Press Juicer Is Perfect If:

  • Your goals are detoxing and getting the most nutrients possible,
  • You also enjoy making nut milks,
  • You juice lots of green, leafy vegetables and want minimal pulp waste,
  • You’re juicing regularly and want a machine that will stand up to the toughest of leafy greens!

Which Is Your Preferred Juicer To Use? Share Your Thoughts In The Comments Section Below!